Disabling the Oracle Diagnostic and Tuning Pack APIs – If you want something done, do it yourself

At last, we have reached the final episode of the Star Wars themed odyssey through the tangled web that is Oracle’s Diagnostic and Tuning Pack licensing.
Just as well really, Deb has flatly refused to give over any more evenings to my “research” – i.e. re-watching all of the films. Even the appeal of Ewan MacGregor’s Alec Guiness impression has now waned.
Just to recap then, so far I’ve looked at :

Now, finally we’re going to have a look at how we can minimize the chances of an errant select statement causing a whole heap of trouble.
Yes, we’re going to have a go at disabling access to the Diagnostic and Tuning Pack APIs without (hopefully), breaking anything.
Continue reading

Oracle Schema Differences – keeping up with the Prefix Pixie

Saturday 11th September 1976. That was the day that my Dad first took me to see the (occasionally) mighty West Ham United.
The opponents, the rather more often mighty Arsenal.
I still have vivid memories of that game. The noise from the crowd. The fact that the grass looked so green, brighter than on the TV.
West Ham not playing very well. Frank Stapleton putting a bit of a downer on the day by having the temerity to score twice in a 2-0 win for the Gunners.
My Dad recently celebrated his 70th birthday.
His present from his first-born son ? A trip to see the (previously) mighty Luton Town take on the ( probably must have been from time to time) mighty Nuneaton Borough.
Now, this may seem poor reward for my dear old Dad – he takes me to see two of the top teams in the country and he gets the Blue Square Premier League in return.
Additionally, these days it’s less the colour of the grass that assaults the senses than the colour of the boots.
These are various flourescent colours, virtually none of them black.
Mind you, as Deb pointed out, if you play for Luton and spend most of your working life dressed in bright orange, then accessorising must be a bit of a challenge.
The game itself however, is another matter.
Typical English Football – very quick, lots of commitment. You can tell it’s not the Premiership by the absence of millionaires rolling around the floor in apparent agony because they’ve broken a finger-nail.
Two late goals sends the Hatters home happy.
All of which has nothing to do with the subject of this post, apart from my choice of examples.
Comparing the table structure between different schemas is standard functionality for any self-respecting IDE. However, things get a bit more tricky if you’ve had a visit from the Prefix Pixie. He, she (or it if you’re table relationship diagram dropped out of a design tool) thought it’d be a good idea to give the same prefix to every table in the schema.

The result of this is that the tools in the IDE can’t recognize that tables with different names are meant to have identical structures.
So much for the “Premiership” of Database Development, it looks like we’ll just have to do a bit of D.I.Y. to see through the poxie pixie dust.
Dad would approve. Continue reading

Born Before Computers – fogey foibles and forsight for the humble insert

Apparently, I am considered by some to be stuck in my ways.
For example, Deb now refuses to stand with me in the supermarket queue because of my tendency to argue with the automated checkout.

This even extends into my working life where I have a colleague who is a bit more hip and with it when it comes to writing code.
The rest of us in the Oracle team – slightly older than this person it must be said – are apparently “BBC”.
This isn’t some reference to the venerable British Broadcasting Corporation, nor even to the BBC micro which was popular back in the 80’s.
Evidently, it is something of a disadvantage to have been “Born Before Computers”.
I’ll confess, I do write most of my database code in a text editior and run it via SQL*PLUS. Whilst I use an IDE for looking at stored database code, I’m not that keen on using it as a code environment.
As is usually the case, sometimes things are done in a certain way for years because that’s the best way to do it…and sometimes it’s simply because “that’s how we’ve always done it”.
The trick is, knowing which is which.

All of which brings us to the INSERT statement. Continue reading

Oracle Batch Job Logging – a framework for domestic harmony

Like most men, I have a standard of tidiness and cleanliness that I think of as “Bloke Clean”.
Deb’s standards are rather higher ( she would say normal). The difference can occasionally be a source of tension.
“Maybe I’ll just run off with that Steven Feuerstein bloke !”, she may have said during one of our discussions about the state of the study.
“Oh really ?”, I might retort, “and what’s he got that I haven’t ?”,
“Money, fame, talent and his own framework…not to mention a cleaner, I’ll bet”.
“Well…at least I have more hair”, I might say, disconcerted by her surprisingly comprehensive knowledge of someone who, it must be said, is not exactly famous outside of the wonderful world of Oracle.
“Not by much.” would probably have been the devastating reply.
Predictably, a compromise has now been reached…the upshot of which is that I’ve just spent the afternoon becoming intoxicated by the fumes from various cleaning products…and the study is now gleaming and all the papers filed away…and we’re getting a cleaner.
As for the money, fame and talent…well, I’ll just have to make do with the framework for now.
Truth be told, calling it a framework is overstating things a bit. But hey, it does give me an excuse to come up with a (possibly) amusing name. Continue reading

Running a Windows Batch file from DBMS_SCHEDULER

In an ideal world ….

Luton would have won the play-off final
I would have won the lottery by now
…and Oracle databases would run on Linux.

Out in the real world however, there are times when Oracle running on a Windows server is just unavoidable.
That’ll be the Real World with real data and real security issues, mixed in with – possibly – the real need to initiate a batch script from inside the database.
What follows are details of how to do this in Oracle 10g R2 running on a Windows server. Continue reading

Implicit Cursors are from Venus, Explicit Cursors are from Mars

Domestic bliss. There’s nothing like it. There’s certainly nothing like it in our house, particularly when I indulge in one of my endearing little foibles that is guaranteed to get Deb pouting like Angelina Jolie suffering a nasty reaction to a wasp-sting.
Whether it’s leaving the toilet seat up, or hanging my clothes up on the nearest floor, there are some days where I just can’t seem to do anything right.
Having said that, I must confess that I myself, am not a model of toleration. My own personal pout trigger is a query that looks something like this :

SELECT NVL(COUNT(*), 0)
FROM some_table;

I’ve seen this quite a bit recently, usually in the form of an explicit cursor.
Once I’ve got the rant about this out of my system, I’ll then look at how you might make single-row sub-queries a bit more efficient without ending up knee-deep in implicit cursors.
I’ll also ponder what it actually is that we really know about cursors. Continue reading