Born Before Computers – fogey foibles and forsight for the humble insert

Apparently, I am considered by some to be stuck in my ways.
For example, Deb now refuses to stand with me in the supermarket queue because of my tendency to argue with the automated checkout.

This even extends into my working life where I have a colleague who is a bit more hip and with it when it comes to writing code.
The rest of us in the Oracle team – slightly older than this person it must be said – are apparently “BBC”.
This isn’t some reference to the venerable British Broadcasting Corporation, nor even to the BBC micro which was popular back in the 80′s.
Evidently, it is something of a disadvantage to have been “Born Before Computers”.
I’ll confess, I do write most of my database code in a text editior and run it via SQL*PLUS. Whilst I use an IDE for looking at stored database code, I’m not that keen on using it as a code environment.
As is usually the case, sometimes things are done in a certain way for years because that’s the best way to do it…and sometimes it’s simply because “that’s how we’ve always done it”.
The trick is, knowing which is which.

All of which brings us to the INSERT statement. Continue reading

Oracle Batch Job Logging – a framework for domestic harmony

Like most men, I have a standard of tidiness and cleanliness that I think of as “Bloke Clean”.
Deb’s standards are rather higher ( she would say normal). The difference can occasionally be a source of tension.
“Maybe I’ll just run off with that Steven Feuerstein bloke !”, she may have said during one of our discussions about the state of the study.
“Oh really ?”, I might retort, “and what’s he got that I haven’t ?”,
“Money, fame, talent and his own framework…not to mention a cleaner, I’ll bet”.
“Well…at least I have more hair”, I might say, disconcerted by her surprisingly comprehensive knowledge of someone who, it must be said, is not exactly famous outside of the wonderful world of Oracle.
“Not by much.” would probably have been the devastating reply.
Predictably, a compromise has now been reached…the upshot of which is that I’ve just spent the afternoon becoming intoxicated by the fumes from various cleaning products…and the study is now gleaming and all the papers filed away…and we’re getting a cleaner.
As for the money, fame and talent…well, I’ll just have to make do with the framework for now.
Truth be told, calling it a framework is overstating things a bit. But hey, it does give me an excuse to come up with a (possibly) amusing name. Continue reading

Windows batch scripting and learning to love German footballers

Windows scripting – the computing equivalent of the German football team.
I suppose I should qualify that statement, if only to avoid irate comments from any German readers.
The German National side has always been admired rather than loved.

Yes, they have been more successful than most, and have produced more than their share of great players (Beckenbauer,
Rummenigge, Matthaus…add you’re own favourites here). Yet they are rarely cheered by the neutral.
This lack of popularity probably has quite a bit to do with the fact that, in major finals, Germany seem to be condemned to be cast as the bad guys against the forces of footballing light (the Total Football of Cruyff’s Netherlands in 1974), or the plucky underdog (Czechoslovakia in 1976, Denmark in 1992).

The footballing triumph regarded by Germans above all others is Das Wunder von Berne.
The 1954 World Cup Final was meant to be a coronation of one of the great teams in history. The Hungarians of Ferenc Puskas came into the final on the back of an unbeaten run going back 4 years, including an 8-3 thrashing of West Germany in the group stages of the tournament.

After eight minutes of the final, all was going to plan with Hungary already 2-0 up. What followed was one of the great comebacks – and great upsets – in the history of the game. Rahn completed the miracle with his second of the match, and the winner, with six minutes left.
Sepp Herberger, Fritz Walter and Helmut Rahn are the German equivalent of Alf Ramsey, Bobby Moore and Geoff Hurst. Outside of Germany, they remain largely unknown.
Incidentally, apologies for that 1966 reference, but unlike Germans (Italians, Spaniards…) we English have only that single triumph, or the odd glorious failure to look back on.

So, back to Windows batch scripting. It’s widely used, but next to the richness and variety of it’s siblings in the unix world, it appears hideously limited. However, there are times where it is simply unavoidable.

What follows are some basic examples of

  • Accepting user input
  • Using variables
  • a simple for loop ( because there is no other kind )
  • branching
  • interaction with an Oracle database

At this point, I have to say that if you are on a Unix/Linux system, or have access to Cygwin, there are far better ways of working with your database.

For any remaining poor unfortunates… Continue reading

The CASE against DECODE and the Misery of Penalties

Euro2012 has come and gone. That sigh of relief is the sound of Deb reclaiming the TV remote and banning me from watching any more sport for the rest of the summer.
Spain have confirmed themselves as one of the great teams in history by winning yet again.
It has been said that they are boring. As far as I can see, the only boring thing about them is their predictability in not letting anyone else win.
By that measure, England are pretty boring as well although, if you wanted to be a bit more positive, you’d say consistent. How much of a lottery can penalties be when you lose all the time ?
I’m not even going to pretend that the above ramble connects in any way to the subject of today’s wander through the wacky world of ANSI SQL…although you may notice that I’ve taken inspiration from recent events for some of the examples.
When Oracle first came out, there was no ANSI standard SQL. There weren’t any other relational database on the market.
As a result, there are various programming constructs that are still a bit non-standard.
Yes, Oracle has introduced the ANSI standard equivalents over time and insisted that both the proprietary and ANSI syntax work in exactly the same way. This is true. For the most part.
I have already noted the advantage of ANSI join syntax when using more than one outer join.
Here, however, I’m going to turn my attention to a useful little feature of the CASE statement. Continue reading

Time travel with fixed_date

My Dad is a bit of a clever-clogs at the moment.
When he confidently predicted that Chelsea would beat Barcelona in the Champions League back in April,
I put this down to an affinity with the Chelsea squad which, lets face it, is rather nearer to his age-group than those at most other big clubs.
Since then however, he’s been on a roll, culminating in his unerring prediction that Sweden would beat France in the Euros.
This almost cephalopodic accuracy ( remember Paul the Octopus) is about to be put to it’s sternest test.
According to Dad, England will beat Italy on Sunday.
Hopefully, this is just another example of his prescience rather than a case of being swept up in the mood of the moment. Roy Hodgson has gone from being “why on did they go for this old codger” to “I always knew he was the man for the job” in the space of six weeks.
English football fans, fickle? I don’t know where you get that idea.
All of which provides a fairly tenuous link to the subject at hand – testing date sensitive changes in Oracle. Continue reading

Leading Zeros…the bleeding edge of TO_CHAR format masks

We’ve been busy playing with our new house.
Deb has re-arranged the furniture about three times since we moved in.
Well, she’s actually just specified where she wants the furniture, it’s me who has actually moved it about.
In fairness, she is the one who brings all the taste, style and interior design skills to our relationship. I’m more of the Igor who just does the legwork at her bidding.
My protestations about the importance of Euro 2012 have been met with the response that it can’t be that important a football tournament because Wales aren’t playing in it.
One of the benefits of moving into a new place is that stuff just works. You hit a light switch and the light comes on.
It’s a bit like using TO_CHAR to convert a number in Oracle really. Look, I’ll show you…
Continue reading