Getting APEX to play with Ref Cursors

It’s that time of year again. Things are a bit tense around the house.
The other morning, I woke up to find that someone had placed a leek in my slippers.
Yes it’s Six Nations time again. England are playing Wales on Saturday. The lovely Debbie is getting into the spirit of the occasion…by exhibiting extreme antagonism to all things English.

Whilst the patriot in me would like to cheer on the Red Rose on Saturday, I have decided that discretion ( or in this case, cowardice) is the better part of valour and will instead, sit quietly in the corner, hoping for a draw. That way, I’ve not sold out completely and next week will be far more pleasant if Wales have not lost.

For those readers who know Rugby Union as merely another one of those odd games that we English let our former colonies win at, all you need to know is, the Welsh take this sport very seriously.

In the meantime, I’m trying to keep a low profile, which means playing around with APEX 4.1.

The heady excitement of discovering the first decent GUI development environment for PL/SQL programmers since Oracle Forms is now starting to be replaced by some of the harsh realities of modern web development.
For example, how can I reuse all those terribly useful functions that return Ref Cursors ?
I mean, they work fine in PHP and various other languages, and APEX itself is written in PL/SQL. Should be easy, shouldn’t it ?

Er, no.

APEX simply refuses to play. “I laugh in the face of your weakly typed Ref Cursor” it seems to say. Clearly, some persuasion is required if I’m not to end up with a lot of code locked away in my APEX application, unusable by any other programming language I might want to use to build a web front-end for my database.
The way to an APEX application’s heart is, as will become apparent, through Pipelined functions. Continue reading

Nested Tables – Flat-packed data in an Oracle Table

In the aftermath of the holiday season, there follows the inevitable January sales.
This year, I have been spared the inevitable trudge around the stores. Deb has hurt her knee and has therefore been restricted to browsing on-line.

I thought she “kneeded” cheering up, but to date, my attempts at lightening the mood, seem only to have given her the “kneedle”.

Sitting quietly, whilst Deb is wandering through various furniture store websites, I had cause to reflect on Oracle’s own version of Nested Tables.
These were introduced way back in Oracle 8, when Oracle confidently predicted that the Object-Relational Database was the way of the future.
Imagine if they were just bringing this feature out now. You can picture it. Larry would have spent months making disparaging remarks about IKEA’s occasional table range, before unveiling his own version, which was better, cheaper and more efficient.

Whilst you’re never going to be able to rest your pint on one, a Nested Table in Oracle may be useful on occasion. Continue reading