Oracle Database Diagnostic and Tuning Packs – exactly what are you not licensed for ?

It’s that time of year. The expense of Christmas is becoming apparent and January payday has seemed to be forever in arriving.
“…and I need a crown !”, said Deb.
This caused me to pause for a moment. Was my better half getting delusions of granduer ?
Further, delicate enquiries revealed that it was merely a dental crown to which she was referring.
Not that it seems to make much difference financially. You could probably buy a fairly substantial piece of regal headgear for what the dentist was asking.

On the plus side, Queen Deb’s costume for the next instalment of the Licensing Epic doesn’t require such accoutriments…although a big pair of headphones and lots of hairspray may be in order. Yes, I’m still on my Star Wars themed odyssey through Oracle Database Licensing.

In the previous posts, I’ve already covered :

Now, it’s time to get to grips with the licensing minefield that are the Diagnostic and Tuning Packs.
Queue the orchestra….

Episode 2 – Attack of the Diagnostic and Tuning Packs

Confusion is rife in the Data Centre. The Geeki have found that the incredibly useful AWR and ASH utilities are in fact secret members of The Diagnostic Pack.
Fearing the presence of the Dark Side, they must now re-enter the realms of the mysterious Oracle Database License to

  • Determine which features are part of these packs
  • Work out exactly what constitutes usage of these packs
  • find out which database objects that are part of these packs

With this information, at least they will know which objects they must avoid if they are not to have to pay substanital additonal licenses…

Disclaimer

This code has been written and tested on Oracle Database 11gR2 Express Edition.
The licensing information I’ve referenced is for Oracle Database 11gR2.
I’m fairly sure it all works as expected. However, as you undoubtedly know, you shouldn’t take my word for it.
Before you go playing around with this on any production environment, please make sure it does what I think it does.
Of course, if you do find any issues, I’d be great if you could put a comment on here so that I can correct any issues…and also to give a pointer to anyone else looking at this post.
Yes, I know the standard disclaimer about “similarity to events or persons living or dead” always goes at the end of the film, but I thought it best to put it at the start.
Incidentally, have you ever wondered exactly what real-life events Star Wars could have a similarity to ?

Continue reading

Born Before Computers – fogey foibles and forsight for the humble insert

Apparently, I am considered by some to be stuck in my ways.
For example, Deb now refuses to stand with me in the supermarket queue because of my tendency to argue with the automated checkout.

This even extends into my working life where I have a colleague who is a bit more hip and with it when it comes to writing code.
The rest of us in the Oracle team – slightly older than this person it must be said – are apparently “BBC”.
This isn’t some reference to the venerable British Broadcasting Corporation, nor even to the BBC micro which was popular back in the 80’s.
Evidently, it is something of a disadvantage to have been “Born Before Computers”.
I’ll confess, I do write most of my database code in a text editior and run it via SQL*PLUS. Whilst I use an IDE for looking at stored database code, I’m not that keen on using it as a code environment.
As is usually the case, sometimes things are done in a certain way for years because that’s the best way to do it…and sometimes it’s simply because “that’s how we’ve always done it”.
The trick is, knowing which is which.

All of which brings us to the INSERT statement. Continue reading

Reverse Engineering a Crud Matrix complete with SQLDeveloper Extension – Version 2

A couple of years ago, I wrote an application to reverse-engineer a CRUD matrix for tables in an Oracle database.
I’ve since used it quite a lot for impact analysis and have refined it a fair amount. I’m now happy enough with the new version to let it take it’s first steps into the wider world….where doubtless people will be able to find some of the bugs that I’ve missed.
At this point, if you’re wondering what a CRUD matrix is, you can have a look at the original post here. Continue reading