Oracle Database Diagnostic and Tuning Packs – exactly what are you not licensed for ?

It’s that time of year. The expense of Christmas is becoming apparent and January payday has seemed to be forever in arriving.
“…and I need a crown !”, said Deb.
This caused me to pause for a moment. Was my better half getting delusions of granduer ?
Further, delicate enquiries revealed that it was merely a dental crown to which she was referring.
Not that it seems to make much difference financially. You could probably buy a fairly substantial piece of regal headgear for what the dentist was asking.

On the plus side, Queen Deb’s costume for the next instalment of the Licensing Epic doesn’t require such accoutriments…although a big pair of headphones and lots of hairspray may be in order. Yes, I’m still on my Star Wars themed odyssey through Oracle Database Licensing.

In the previous posts, I’ve already covered :

Now, it’s time to get to grips with the licensing minefield that are the Diagnostic and Tuning Packs.
Queue the orchestra….

Episode 2 – Attack of the Diagnostic and Tuning Packs

Confusion is rife in the Data Centre. The Geeki have found that the incredibly useful AWR and ASH utilities are in fact secret members of The Diagnostic Pack.
Fearing the presence of the Dark Side, they must now re-enter the realms of the mysterious Oracle Database License to

  • Determine which features are part of these packs
  • Work out exactly what constitutes usage of these packs
  • find out which database objects that are part of these packs

With this information, at least they will know which objects they must avoid if they are not to have to pay substanital additonal licenses…

Disclaimer

This code has been written and tested on Oracle Database 11gR2 Express Edition.
The licensing information I’ve referenced is for Oracle Database 11gR2.
I’m fairly sure it all works as expected. However, as you undoubtedly know, you shouldn’t take my word for it.
Before you go playing around with this on any production environment, please make sure it does what I think it does.
Of course, if you do find any issues, I’d be great if you could put a comment on here so that I can correct any issues…and also to give a pointer to anyone else looking at this post.
Yes, I know the standard disclaimer about “similarity to events or persons living or dead” always goes at the end of the film, but I thought it best to put it at the start.
Incidentally, have you ever wondered exactly what real-life events Star Wars could have a similarity to ?

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Migrating Oracle Data from Windows to Linux using DataPump

It was a dark, stormy night in Redwood Shores. Only a single light burned at Oracle Towers. The Marketing Department was still locked in conference.
Countless flip-chart sheets littered the room, the result of thought-showers, story-boarding and numerous break-out imagineering sessions.
The challenge with which they had grappled all this time ? How to re-brand the long-time staple, but not particularly exciting export/import utility.
Suddenly, one nameless alpha-male ( and it must surely have been a man) rose to his feet, propelled by a lightning strike of inspiration. In a great, booming voice, dripping with testosterone, pelvis-thrusting beneath his ample girth for added emphasis, he announced to the room, “I know, let’s call it Data Pump !”

The name may have changed, the odd bell-and-whistle added, but the purpose remains unchanged. Export/Import ( Data Pump, if you must), is a utility for transferring objects and data from one Oracle instance to another, irrespective of the Operating System on which either the source or target database is running. Continue reading