How Oracle uses Space, sort of.

Space. The Final Frontier.
My long-suffering Mrs does enjoy a bit of sci-fi especially if some hunky all-action type is wandering around with his shirt off.
“That man has such a nice personality”, she may well sigh, staring dreamily at the screen.

As with any software Oracle error messages can look as if they’ve been put together in some alien language.
This is especially true if your fairly new to Oracle.
When you get space errors in Oracle, the answer is not necessarily to simply add more space.

What we’re going to look at here is :

  • what a tablespace is and the various things they are used for
  • how redo logs work ( and how they are archived)
  • some of the space related errors you may encounter and what the underlying causes may be

Of necessity, I’ve made some generalisations here. The purpose of this post is not to provide an in-depth technical guide to the inner workings of Oracle. Rather it is to provide enough information for you to work out whether you should be looking up the phone number for your hard-pressed DBA, or looking at that bit of code you’ve just run.

Also, like the author, this post is a bit short of cache. For the sake of simplicity (and that weak pun), I’m going to pretend that Oracle uses memory in one amorphous lump.
Additionally, I’ve not taken into consideration Direct Path Inserts.

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An APEX Database Monitoring App for XE – Guilty GUI pleasures

Guilty pleasures. For some, it’s a “diet” burger with “diet” fries, washed down with a “diet” shake. Others have a penchant for Kurt Geiger shoes. “I’m Welsh and I’m worth it”, they may well say. It may even be that Def Leppard track nestled in your playlist between Coldplay and Oasis.

In programming terms, APEX seems to fall into this category for me. On the one hand, it’s a declarative development environment. This means that, unless you’re very careful, the application you write for it is not going to be too portable to other front-end technologies. But, oh, it’s so nice to be able to bang out a bit of SQL and/or PL/SQL, click my mouse in the right place, and have a nice GUI application drop onto my browser.

If you’ve decided to try the latest and greatest APEX version on your XE installation, you’ll notice that the default Database Welcome Page disappears after the upgrade.
Rather than hunting around for it, I’ve decided to knock up something a bit better…well, different.
So, if you’d like to know how to get some interesting configuration information out of the database…or just want the entertainment value of watching me blunder about in APEX then read on… Continue reading