Implicit Cursors are from Venus, Explicit Cursors are from Mars

Domestic bliss. There’s nothing like it. There’s certainly nothing like it in our house, particularly when I indulge in one of my endearing little foibles that is guaranteed to get Deb pouting like Angelina Jolie suffering a nasty reaction to a wasp-sting.
Whether it’s leaving the toilet seat up, or hanging my clothes up on the nearest floor, there are some days where I just can’t seem to do anything right.
Having said that, I must confess that I myself, am not a model of toleration. My own personal pout trigger is a query that looks something like this :

SELECT NVL(COUNT(*), 0)
FROM some_table;

I’ve seen this quite a bit recently, usually in the form of an explicit cursor.
Once I’ve got the rant about this out of my system, I’ll then look at how you might make single-row sub-queries a bit more efficient without ending up knee-deep in implicit cursors.
I’ll also ponder what it actually is that we really know about cursors. Continue reading

Oracle SQL and PL/SQL Coding Standards – Cat Herding for Dummies

Whilst in Montreal recently, Deb and I made a pilgrimage to the Circuit Giles Villeneuve, home of the Canadian Grand Prix. When not in use, the track is open to the public. It’s divided into two lanes – one for people to walk and cycle down down, and a one for people to drive down.
You can just imagine flying round in an F1 car. You come out of the excruciatingly slow L’epingle hairpin and build up to top speed as you tear down the Casino Straight. Ahead lies the final chicane before the start/finish line. A tricky right left combination with the treacherous curb on the inside of the last turn ready to spit the unwary into the Wall of Champions on the opposite side of the track.
At over 300 kph you start to think about spotting your braking point. Suddenly, this comes into view….

What do you think this is, a race track ?

… and now you know what it’s like to be a programmer, who has channeled raw inspiration through his or her dancing fingers to produce a thing of beauty and elegance…only to run into the QA person pointing out that the commas are in the wrong place according to page 823, paragraph 2 sub-section e of The Coding Standards.

Often measured in weight rather than the number of pages, Coding Standards documents are often outdated, arbitrary and just plain wrong.
On the other hand, their absence can cause much heartache, not least to those poor souls in support who are trying to maintain code where the Agilista philosophy of Code over Documentation has been taken to the ultimate extreme.

What follows is an attempt to make sense of the Coding Standards conundrum.
I’ll look at what I think a Coding Standards document should contain, and what it shouldn’t.
Then I’ll give some suggestions as to standards for Oracle SQL and PL/SQL which you can either embrace or throw rocks at, depending on your preference.
Before all of that however, I feel the need for some serious catharsis… Continue reading