Disabling the Oracle Diagnostic and Tuning Pack APIs – If you want something done, do it yourself

At last, we have reached the final episode of the Star Wars themed odyssey through the tangled web that is Oracle’s Diagnostic and Tuning Pack licensing.
Just as well really, Deb has flatly refused to give over any more evenings to my “research” – i.e. re-watching all of the films. Even the appeal of Ewan MacGregor’s Alec Guiness impression has now waned.
Just to recap then, so far I’ve looked at :

Now, finally we’re going to have a look at how we can minimize the chances of an errant select statement causing a whole heap of trouble.
Yes, we’re going to have a go at disabling access to the Diagnostic and Tuning Pack APIs without (hopefully), breaking anything.
Continue reading

Oracle Schema Differences – keeping up with the Prefix Pixie

Saturday 11th September 1976. That was the day that my Dad first took me to see the (occasionally) mighty West Ham United.
The opponents, the rather more often mighty Arsenal.
I still have vivid memories of that game. The noise from the crowd. The fact that the grass looked so green, brighter than on the TV.
West Ham not playing very well. Frank Stapleton putting a bit of a downer on the day by having the temerity to score twice in a 2-0 win for the Gunners.
My Dad recently celebrated his 70th birthday.
His present from his first-born son ? A trip to see the (previously) mighty Luton Town take on the ( probably must have been from time to time) mighty Nuneaton Borough.
Now, this may seem poor reward for my dear old Dad – he takes me to see two of the top teams in the country and he gets the Blue Square Premier League in return.
Additionally, these days it’s less the colour of the grass that assaults the senses than the colour of the boots.
These are various flourescent colours, virtually none of them black.
Mind you, as Deb pointed out, if you play for Luton and spend most of your working life dressed in bright orange, then accessorising must be a bit of a challenge.
The game itself however, is another matter.
Typical English Football – very quick, lots of commitment. You can tell it’s not the Premiership by the absence of millionaires rolling around the floor in apparent agony because they’ve broken a finger-nail.
Two late goals sends the Hatters home happy.
All of which has nothing to do with the subject of this post, apart from my choice of examples.
Comparing the table structure between different schemas is standard functionality for any self-respecting IDE. However, things get a bit more tricky if you’ve had a visit from the Prefix Pixie. He, she (or it if you’re table relationship diagram dropped out of a design tool) thought it’d be a good idea to give the same prefix to every table in the schema.

The result of this is that the tools in the IDE can’t recognize that tables with different names are meant to have identical structures.
So much for the “Premiership” of Database Development, it looks like we’ll just have to do a bit of D.I.Y. to see through the poxie pixie dust.
Dad would approve. Continue reading

Reverse Engineering a Crud Matrix complete with SQLDeveloper Extension – Version 2

A couple of years ago, I wrote an application to reverse-engineer a CRUD matrix for tables in an Oracle database.
I’ve since used it quite a lot for impact analysis and have refined it a fair amount. I’m now happy enough with the new version to let it take it’s first steps into the wider world….where doubtless people will be able to find some of the bugs that I’ve missed.
At this point, if you’re wondering what a CRUD matrix is, you can have a look at the original post here. Continue reading