Configuring Django with Apache on a Raspberry Pi

Deb has another job for me to do around the house.
She would like to have a means of looking up which Films/TV Series we have lying around on Blu-Ray or DVD so she can save time looking for films we haven’t actually got. Just to be clear, she doesn’t mind hunting around for the disc in question, she just wants to make sure that it’s somewhere to be found in the first place.
She wants to be able to do this on any device at any time (let’s face it, there’s even a browser on your telly these days).
As DIY jobs go, this is a long way from being the worst as far as I’m concerned. After all, this time I should be able to put something together without the potential for carnage that’s usually attendant when I reach for the toolbox.

I happen to have a Raspberry Pi lying around which should serve as the perfect hardware platform for this sort of low traffic, low data-volume application.
The Pi is running Raspbian Jessie.
Therefore, Python is the obvious choice of programming language to use. By extension therefore, Django appears to be a rather appropriate framework.
In order to store the details of each movie we have, we’ll need a database. Django uses with Sqlite as the default.

We’ll also need an HTTP server. Whilst Django has it’s own built-in “development” server for playing around with, the favoured production http server appears to be Apache.

Now, getting Django and Apache to talk to each other seems to get a bit fiddly in places so what follows is a description of the steps I took to get this working…leaving out all the bits where I hammered my thumb…

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Apache, Aliases and Zenity on Ubuntu – how to control your ego

It’s the weekend. My girlfriend is staring at the screen in ferocious concentration as she does battle with her latest essay plan for the Masters she’s studying for.
Evicted from the desk and consigned to a dark corner, I’m trying to find some diverting, productive and, above all, quiet, way to amuse myself. As any parent will know, when the kids are quiet, it usually means they’re up to something… Continue reading

Configuring OPAL on Ubuntu Desktop – without the Oracle Instant Client

Many years ago, my son had more-or-less worked out that Santa was a myth, but hadn’t wanted to say anything for fear of decreasing the number of Christmas presents he might get.
Taking my parental duties as seriously as I do, I took him to one side and explained the truth…
After Return of the Jedi, Darth Vader fell upon hard-times. There weren’t many film roles about for Dark Lords of the Sith. Eventually he decided upon a change of career and bought the round off Father Christmas, who was retiring.
Obviously, Darth Vader has a rather more direct approach to naughty children and if my son didn’t behave himself, not only would he not get any presents but he might get something cut off.
It is for this reason that Simon has the Darth Vader theme as the ringtone on his phone for when I call.

All of which has at best, a tenuous link to the theme of this post ( but I thought it was time to get into the festive spirit).

Following on from last week’s introduction to PL/SQL, some people have asked about using PL/SQL a web application (without all that mucky APEX stuff). In order to start working up some examples of this, I thought it would be a good idea to use PHP as a front-end. Yes – Oracle’s version of a LAMP system – Oracle, PHP, Apache, Linux (OPAL). After all, how hard could it be ?
Continue reading