Gits and Giggles – Getting onto Github from Mint

“Github ?” said Deb, “sounds like a chat room for grumpy old men. You should fit right in !”
To be fair, neither of us were in a particularly good mood at the time.
Deb had just been made to sit through the Rugby World Cup Final whilst my emergency backup nationality had finally born fruit.
All I said to her was that it’s nice to be able to support a real country rather than a mere principality, like Wales. Honestly, some people are so touchy.

For my part, I had just discovered that Github, based on the Git source control system written by Linus Torvalds himself, has integrated clients for Windows and Mac, but not for Linux.

No matter. If you want to interact with Github, you’ll need to have Git installed on your client machine anyway and, mine being Linux, there are a number of GUIs available for Git.

Aside from the Git documentation itself, which is extensive, there are a number of excellent guides to both Git and Github available.
Rather than re-hashing these – although I will link some of them – I’m going to look at things from a slightly different perspective.

Throughout my career, I’ve been, first and foremost, a database developer.
Way back when, choices of version control systems were rather limited. In a professional sense, I grew up with PVCS and Visual Source Safe.
Even later on, the fact that Oracle Forms and Reports were binary source code meant that the Edit-Merge paradigm of source control was something that tended not to gain traction in the Oracle Shops that I worked in.

Later on, in larger organisations, Perforce was the tool of choice, although always with the comforting P4Win ( and later P4V) front-end.

So, I’d rather like the comfort of a GUI, if only to see that the files I think I’ve checked in are actually there.

Additionally, Github uses an enhanced version of the Markdown language for text files. It would be nice to be able to preview these files before uploading them to the repository.

First things first then…. Continue reading