Breaking the Rules – why sometimes it’s OK to have a standalone PL/SQL Function

It was late. We were snuggled up on the sofa, watching a Romcom and debating whether to go to bed or see it through to the bitter( well, sickly sweet) end.

Wearily, I made the point that in the end the film would follow Heigl’s Iron Law of Romcom which can be summarised as “Katherine always gets her man”.

Deb begged to differ. Her argument was that, for every Colin Firth, riding into the sunset with his Bridget Jones, there’s a poor( largely blameless) Patrick Dempsey whose immediate future includes long-evenings alone in front of the telly and shopping for microwave meals for one.
The point is that even the most rigid rules tend to have their exceptions.

The star of this post is the oft-quoted rule that PL/SQL program units should always be incorporated into a Package.
There are special cameo appearances by “Never use Public Synonyms” and the ever popular “Never grant privileges to Public”.

Continue reading

Disabling the Oracle Diagnostic and Tuning Pack APIs – If you want something done, do it yourself

At last, we have reached the final episode of the Star Wars themed odyssey through the tangled web that is Oracle’s Diagnostic and Tuning Pack licensing.
Just as well really, Deb has flatly refused to give over any more evenings to my “research” – i.e. re-watching all of the films. Even the appeal of Ewan MacGregor’s Alec Guiness impression has now waned.
Just to recap then, so far I’ve looked at :

Now, finally we’re going to have a look at how we can minimize the chances of an errant select statement causing a whole heap of trouble.
Yes, we’re going to have a go at disabling access to the Diagnostic and Tuning Pack APIs without (hopefully), breaking anything.
Continue reading