Using Edition Based Redefinition for Rolling Back Stored Program Unit Changes

We had a few days of warm, sunny weather in Milton Keynes recently and this induced Deb and I to purchase a Garden Umberella to provide some shade.
After a lifetime of Great British Summers we should have known better. The sun hasn’t been seen since.
As for the umbrella ? Well that does still serve a purpose – it keeps the rain off.

Rather like an umbrella Oracle’s Edition Based Redefinition feature can be utilized for purposes other than those for which it was designed.
Introducted in Oracle Database 11gR2, Edition Based Redefinition (EBR to it’s friends) is a mechanism for facilitating zero-downtime releases of application code.
It achieves this by separating the deployment of code to the database and that code being made visible in the application.

To fully retro-fit EBR to an application, you would need to create special views – Editioning Views – for each application table and then ensure that any application code referenced those views and not the underlying tables.
Even if you do have a full automated test suite to perform your regression tests, this is likely to be a major undertaking.
The other aspect of EBR, one which is of interest here, is the way it allows you to have multiple versions of the same stored program unit in the database concurrently.

Generally speaking, as a database application matures, the changes made to it tend to be in the code rather more than in the table structure.
So, rather than diving feet-first into a full EBR deployment, what I’m going to look at here is how we could use EBR to:

  • decouple the deployment and release of stored program units
  • speed up the process of rolling back the release of multiple stored program unit changes
  • create a simple mechanism to roll back individual stored program unit changes

There’s a very good introductory article to EBR on OracleBase.
Whilst you’re here though, forget any Cross-Edition Trigger or Editioning View complexity and let’s dive into… Continue reading

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Dude, Where’s My File ? Finding External Table Files in the midst of (another) General Election

It’s early summer in the UK, which means it must be time for an epoch defining vote of some kind. No, I’m not talking about Britain’s Got Talent.
Having promised that there wouldn’t be another General Election until 2020, our political classes have now decided that they can’t go any longer without asking us what we think. Again.
Try as I might, it may not be possible to prevent the ear-worm phrases from the current campaign slipping into this post.
What I want to look at is how you can persuade Oracle to tell you the location on disk of any files associated with a given external table.
Specifically, I’ll be covering :

  • getting the name of the Database Server
  • finding the fully qualified path of the datafile the external table is pointing to
  • finding other files associated with the table, such as logfiles

In the course of this, we’ll be challenging the orthodoxy of Western Capitalism “If You Can Do It In SQL…” with the principle of DRY ( Don’t Repeat Yourself).
Hopefully I’ll be able to come up with a solution that is “Strong and Stable” and yet at the same time “Works For The Many, Not the Few”…
Continue reading